………………………………………………………………………………… This blog follows our recent book of the same title published by Routledge. Rurality is interpreted in many ways depending on individual encounters with rural space. Debate should not be restricted to the pages of the book so please join in here.

Rural Images Experiment


Thanks to Saturday’s Geography “offer holders” for taking part in my mini-experiment, attributing certain quotations to different images that might be considered “rural”.  With 11 photographs of different rural scenes and 6 quotations, the purpose was to highlight a range of views where “rural” means different things to different people. 

Just from the 20 responses last Saturday, although the majority attached the quote “This is what I think of when I hear rural” to images of agriculture (either a combine harvester or some cows), others linked it rural community images or a shop or a church and some attributed to a photograph of a millpond surrounded with wild growing vegetation.  Whether “rural” means “farming”, “village communities” or “places that are beyond the immediate reach of human habitation” has major implications for how we should conceive rural development and rural planning policies. 

Other findings of note included the idea that “natural” only applied to images that at face value showed no evidence of human involvement (even thought the Friesian cows are an imported breed for agriculture and the Millpond was created as the result of human industry in the past).  By contrast no-one considered wind turbines to be “natural” which suggests more efforts are required to convince us that wind power is a natural source of energy!

Tradition was strongly linked to human perspectives of village life with a church, farm barn and village shop featuring strongly.  Some also saw agriculture as a traditional component of rurality – all of which asserts that “tradition” arises out of cultural meanings. 

The most “isolated” image according to the responses was of the Ribblehead viaduct straddling the Yorkshire countryside.  It is interest to reflect that this is part of the national urban infrastructure, linking Carlisle to Leeds and probably offering Wi-Fi access to all the passengers on board the trains!

While this is not a scientific sample and still just a trial run, I think it highlights some interesting pre-conceptions and disparate views about the characteristics of rural England that we should all pause to consider whenever we are making generalised statements about rural issues.

This experiment was first carried out at a book launch event for “Interpreting Rurality; Multidisciplinary perspectives” (edited by Gary Bosworth and Peter Somerville) and a brief resume can be seen here:

http://interpretingrurality.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/2013/11/12/summary-of-the-big-debate/

On the move: International migration to/ in rural areas


KrakowAs co-convener of a special session on international migration to rural areas at the 27th European Society for Sociology Conference, I want to thank everyone that submitted abstracts.

The range of submissions highlights the breadth of research that is taking place in this field, from economic migrants to refugees and across all parts of the EU and North America.  Moving forwards, the topics raise questions for the need to join up research between regions losing population and those gaining population.  Furthermore, there appear to different approaches towards designing policies that support different categories of migrants and that address social and economic challenges differently.

We look forward to bringing these conversations together in Krakow and further details of our session can be viewed here

 

The Rural Research Group relaunches in the School of Geography


After a period of inactivity due to the birth of baby Michael (now 3Mikey

months old, and learning to sit in his own mini chair!) and my move

to take a new position as Deputy Head of Lincoln’s new School of

Geography, the blog should see a new injection of life.

The Rural Research Group is also relaunching in the School

of Geography and details can be found here:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/geography/research/ruralresearchgroup/

 

Hold the front page…


Impale 2016Research by Claire Markham has hit the front cover of the Local Campaign for Real Ale magazine “Impale”  http://www.lincolncamra.org.uk/test/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/impale3_16.pdf

Based on her earlier PhD work, and a co-authored book chapter, we have been offering recommendations to publicans about how they might attempt to stem the rates of village pub closures.  In particular, we encourage them to identify ways to build on the social and heritage values associated with village pubs so that these icons of rural England last for many generations to come.

Saline Agriculture Update


Firstly, thanks to our partners at the Waddenacademie for all of their efforts in getting our Interreg project proposal through to the second stage.  If successful, this will see new test sites for salt-tolerant crops extended across the North Sea Region of Europe and additional research to explore the economic potential of yields and marketing approaches linked to the new crop varieties.  We look forward to continued collaboration over the coming months… and hopefully beyond!

Meanwhile, our new Research Fellow, Zhongwei Xing has joined us in Lincoln International Business School to work on new economic modelling of the risks to the agriculture sector associated with potential increases in salinity of low-lying farmland.  Having previously studied at Lincoln University (New Zealand) he is already feeling at home in his new city!!